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Study Shows Trehalose More Stable Than Other Sugars
Study at UT Southwestern Medical Center Shows Trehalose More Stable than Other Sugars with Enduring Source of Energy

Study at UT Southwestern Medical Center Shows Trehalose More Stable than Other Sugars with Enduring Source of Energy

Comments by J. C. Spencer

Research at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center supports the view that trehalose is more stable than other carbohydrates and provides an enduring source of energy that helps drive cell cycle progression. Trehalose is proving to be the stress buster in supporting life. The study further shows that cells lacking trehalose initiate growth more slowly and frequently exhibit poor survivability. During prolonged quiescence, the moments when the fluid lacks any movement, trehalose storage is often maintained in favor over glycogen, perhaps for it to fulfill its numerous stress-protectant functions.

Here is the Abstract

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Trehalose is a key determinant of the quiescent metabolic state that fuels cell cycle progression upon return to growth

Abstract:

When conditions are unfavorable, virtually all living cells have the capability of entering a resting state termed quiescence or G0. Many aspects of the quiescence program as well as the mechanisms governing the entry and exit from quiescence remain poorly understood. Previous studies using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that upon entry into stationary phase, a quiescent cell population emerges which is heavier in density than nonquiescent cells. Here we show that total intracellular trehalose and glycogen content exhibits substantial correlation with the density of individual cells both in stationary phase batch cultures and during continuous growth. During prolonged quiescence, trehalose stores are often maintained in favor over glycogen, perhaps to fulfill its numerous stress-protectant functions. Immediately upon exit from quiescence, cells preferentially metabolize trehalose over other fuel sources. Moreover, cells lacking trehalose initiate growth more slowly and frequently exhibit poor survivability. Together, our results support the view that trehalose, which is more stable than other carbohydrates, provides an enduring source of energy that helps drive cell cycle progression upon return to growth.

Lei Shi, Benjamin M. Sutter, Xinyue Ye, Benjamin P. Tu*
Department of Biochemistry, UT Southwestern Medical Center
5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX 75390-9038

*Correspondence: benjamin.tu@utsouthwestern.edu
W: (214) 648-7124
F: (214) 648-3346

Running Head: Trehalose and Quiescence in Yeast
Abbreviations: YMC (Yeast Metabolic Cycle)

Click here for the complete paper.

www.endowmentmed.org