Easy Find It Page
Easy Find It
Use Our Mobile Site
Use Our Mobile Site
Share This Website
The Sugar Trehalose
Free NEWS Letter
Affiliate Program
Untitled Document

Already an Affiliate? Click on the link below to access your account-

Affiliate Login

Endowment Book Store
The Trehalose Store
Endowment Store Front
Support The Endowment
Enter Amount:
We Accept
VisaMaster CardAmerican ExpressDiscoverssl lock
Download Store

Download Store

Download 7 Free Newsletters Plus Other Educational Materials

Main Menu
Home
- - - - - - -
Inside the Human Cell
The Sugar Trehalose
- - - - - - -
Sugar Science Forum
Glycomics Training
Interactive Glycomics Brochure
NEWS
7 FREE NEWSletters
HOT Links of Interest
- - - - - - -
Contact Us
Disclaimer
Sitemap
Educational e-textbook
Chapter One

Chapter One

FREE Sneek Peek
Chapter One


Evaluation Forms

Huntington’s General
Health Evaluation
FORM for Trehalose
Nutritional Pilot Survey

Parkinson's General
Health Evaluation
FORM for Trehalose
Nutritional Pilot Survey

Alzheimer / Dementia
General Health Evaluation
FORM for Trehalose
Nutritional Pilot Survey

Diabetic Health Evaluation
FORM for Trehalose
Nutritional Pilot Survey

General Public Health
Evaluation FORM for
Trehalose Nutritional
Pilot Survey (For General
Public without Huntington’s,
Alzheimer’s, or Parkinson’s.)

Who's Online
We have 22 guests online
New Trehalose Use in Foods - Solution to Soggy Mash
New Trehalose Use in Foods

by J. C. Spencer

LasagnaTrehalose has more benefits in foods than just enhancing taste, being tooth friendly, and serving as a very healthful sugar. Trehalose may be your solution for refrigerated foods that form pools of water. Certain foods form pools of water when they are cooled, frozen, or defrosted.

A report in the Food Manufacture 12/10/09 states that very small amounts of trehalose stops moisture migrating from these prepared foods as they thaw. I quote the UK publication, “There’s nothing worse than defrosting a shepherd’s pie and seeing pools of water floating around in it as you put it in the oven. But it’s also interesting for potential application in products that you are told you can’t freeze. The reason you’re told not to freeze them is often because they go watery when they are defrosted. If we could prevent water pooling, these products could be sold frozen or could be subsequently frozen by consumers.”

Trehalose can also be used to similar effect in some multi-component bakery products, where it could reduce moisture migration and help to maximize shelf-life. It is water soluble, highly stable, tooth-friendly, not especially sweet (45% as sweet as sucrose). Companies using trehalose must declare on the ingredients as trehalose.

Check out the full story here.

Print this report.

www.endowmentmed.org

Last Updated ( Oct 20, 2009 at 04:10 PM )