Easy Find It Page
Easy Find It
Use Our Mobile Site
Use Our Mobile Site
Share This Website
The Sugar Trehalose
Free NEWS Letter
Affiliate Program
Untitled Document

Already an Affiliate? Click on the link below to access your account-

Affiliate Login

Endowment Book Store
The Trehalose Store
Endowment Store Front
Support The Endowment
Enter Amount:
We Accept
VisaMaster CardAmerican ExpressDiscoverssl lock
Download Store

Download Store

Download 7 Free Newsletters Plus Other Educational Materials

Main Menu
Home
- - - - - - -
Inside the Human Cell
The Sugar Trehalose
- - - - - - -
Sugar Science Forum
Glycomics Training
Interactive Glycomics Brochure
NEWS
7 FREE NEWSletters
HOT Links of Interest
- - - - - - -
Contact Us
Disclaimer
Sitemap
Educational e-textbook
Chapter One

Chapter One

FREE Sneek Peek
Chapter One


Evaluation Forms

Huntington’s General
Health Evaluation
FORM for Trehalose
Nutritional Pilot Survey

Parkinson's General
Health Evaluation
FORM for Trehalose
Nutritional Pilot Survey

Alzheimer / Dementia
General Health Evaluation
FORM for Trehalose
Nutritional Pilot Survey

Diabetic Health Evaluation
FORM for Trehalose
Nutritional Pilot Survey

General Public Health
Evaluation FORM for
Trehalose Nutritional
Pilot Survey (For General
Public without Huntington’s,
Alzheimer’s, or Parkinson’s.)

Who's Online
We have 98 guests online
Great Fertilizer, May Be Better Than Chemical Feertilizer

Faeces on food crops - safer than you'd think

Spreading human sewage on fields growing food crops doesn't sound appealing, but it's a great fertiliser. What's more, the practice may be safer than generally thought.

The dangerous O157 strain of the common Escherichia coli bacteria found in human excrement dies out faster than expected when sewage sludge is applied to soils, say scientists at Imperial College London.

Until 1998, over a quarter of the UK's sewage sludge - the main solid waste produced by wastewater treatment - was dumped at sea. Just under half was spread onto farmland, and less than a tenth incinerated or placed in landfill. Then the European Union banned sea disposal, leading to a doubling in the amount of sewage sludge in the UK burnt or placed in landfill.

Now Michael Rogers and his colleagues have shown that levels of E. coli O157, which produces a toxin that causes potentially fatal kidney damage, soon plummet when applied to fields in sludge. "Within 70 days, they went down to as little as 10 bacteria per gram, from 100,000 per gram initially," says Rogers, who presented his findings this week in York at the annual meeting of the UK Society for General Microbiology.

That should give farmers greater confidence that they can use sewage sludge to improve soil quality while remaining within guidelines that limit levels of dangerous bacteria in their fields.

Source NewScientist.com